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The electric vehicle market just got a big push with the world’s biggest furniture seller IKEA committing along with 25 other organisations and cities to rolling out a battery-powered, zero emissions future.

IKEA last week committed to making a quarter of its home deliveries by electric vehicles within two years — increasing to 100 per cent by 2025.

The move is part of a campaign by The Climate Group — a non-profit organisation encouraging businesses and cities to transition their fleets to electric vehicles (or “EVs”).

Some 26 States, cities and businesses last week joined the campaign, announcing 100 per cent zero EV targets, in “the biggest collective demonstration of demand for electric vehicles to date”, according to the Climate Group.

The group says more than 60 States and organisations representing 237 million people and corporate revenue of over $US480 billion – have committed to a zero-emission future over the past year.

The news will bring further confidence to the battery metals sector — including ASX stocks focused on materials such as lithium, cobalt and graphite that are needed in EV batteries.

The Climate Group’s chief Helen Clarkson said the announcement opened “a new frontier” for the global auto industry.

“Its biggest customers, public and business fleets, are demonstrating their demand for a huge increase in EVs over the next decade,” she said.

“But this is also a wake-up call for the car makers and the tiny number of governments seeking to stall progress.

“They have a clear choice — go with the momentum and commit to a zero-emission future or miss out on this huge market opportunity.”

The Climate Group’s EV100 initiative brings together companies committed to accelerating the transition to EVs.

On Friday, EV100 signee Ikea said all its home deliveries in the inner cities of Amsterdam, Los Angeles, New York, Paris and Shanghai would be made by electric vehicles or through other zero-emission means by 2020.