On Stockhead today, Carl Capolingua gets charty for Stockhead, SEVEN explorers listing in the next two weeks, and Madonna and Beeple’s weird, NSFW NFTs.

But first … the day ahead.

 

TRADING HALTS

 

The following companies went into trading halts today and are expected out in the next few days:

Amaero International (ASX:3DA) – trading halt pending an announcement in connection with a capital raising

 

MARKETS

Gold: $US1,848.73 (+0.58%)

Silver: $US21.65 (+1.93%)

Nickel (3mth): $US28,309/t (+0.83%)

Copper (3mth): $US9,228.50/t (-0.09%)

Lithium Carbonate, China (Benchmark Minerals Intelligence, May 12): $US72,175/t (-3.3% weekly)

Lithium Hydroxide, China (Benchmark Minerals Intelligence, May 12): $US72,775/t (-1.7% weekly)

Oil (WTI): $US102.04 (+2.29%)

Oil (Brent): $US104.68 (+2.73%)

Iron 62pc Fe: $US123 (-3.91%)

AUD/USD: $US0.69733 (-0.17%)

Bitcoin: $US30,611.03(-4.23%)

 

WHAT GOT YOU TALKING YESTERDAY?

Everyone is frothing over Mark Creasy-backed explorer Galileo Mining’s major palladium-platinum discovery at the ‘Norseman’ project in WA.

 

And the AVZ drama continues…


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YESTERDAY’s BIGGEST SMALL CAP WINNERS

 (Stocks highlighted in yellow rose after making announcements during the trading day).

Scroll or swipe to reveal table. Click headings to sort.

The hands-down winner is Creasy-backed digger Galileo Mining (ASX: GAL) who exploded out of the blocks after sharing news of a major palladium-platinum discovery at the ‘Norseman’ project in WA.

Apparently, all it took was six holes at its Callisto discovery to whack right on to a significant mineralised sulphide unit tucked nicely under an ultramafic sill.

Assays from a further five drill holes are pending, but GAL has already flagged strong geological continuity “with all drill holes intersecting disseminated sulphides”.

The discovery hole at the ‘Callisto’ prospect returned a 33m-long intersection grading 2g/t 3E (1.64g/t palladium, 0.28g/t platinum, 0.09g/t gold), 0.32% copper & 0.30% nickel from 144m.

This 33m assayed intersection occurs within a wider 55m disseminated sulphide zone (126–181m), “indicating the potential for a large mineralised system”, GAL says.

Being on a granted mining lease also means the explorer could potentially accelerate development at Callisto if resource drilling is successful.

There are already geological similarities to South Africa’s colossal ‘Platreef’ palladium-platinum-gold-rhodium-copper-nickel deposits, GAL MD Brad Underwood says.

“This an exceptional result from our Norseman project and with every drill hole undertaken so far intersecting mineralisation, we are hopeful that the initial drill hole will translate into a high-quality resource for mining,” he says.

“While we are at an early stage in the discovery process, the thick and consistent zone of mineralisation, and the extensive prospective strike length, suggests the potential for a large mineralised system.”

This is the latest in string of successes for famed prospector Mark Creasy, who owns 24.6% of GAL and is now several million dollars richer at the close of trade.

Also climbing higher was Strategic Elements (ASX:SOR), up over 40% and looking comfy.

SOR’s action came after it reported that its fully owned subsidiary AAM and research partner The University of New South Wales has succeeded in generating electricity from moisture.

SOR says this firmly establishes the technology as a world leader globally, and also broadens its potential use in electronics with enhanced power requirements.

 

YESTERDAY’S BIGGEST SMALL CAP LOSERS

(Stocks highlighted in yellow fell after making announcements during the trading day).

Scroll or swipe to reveal table. Click headings to sort.

The giant German chemical firm, BASF, has done a total runner on Aussie-listed Bio-Gene Technology (ASX:BGT).

The pair were tinkering together with BGT’s stored grain pest program, but now BASF has said it won’t continue with the program for “internal reasons.”

That’s a bit cloak and dagger, but not that it matters – in the end – BGT has taken a big hit to the share price and is short a giant partner.

Bio-Gene says it’s still upbeat with the new data and will continue to work with Department of Agriculture & Fisheries Queensland Government and the Grains Research & Development Corporation to advance the program.