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Bod Australia has discovered what potheads have known for decades — edibles are an effective way to get cannabis into your body.

The company is trialing a wafer as a way to deliver cannabidiol (CBD), an element of cannabis.

People put the wafer under the tongue and it’s supposed to deliver a dose of Bod’s cannabis extract.

Bod (ASX:BDA) CEO Jo Patterson told Stockhead the Phase 1 clinical trial included getting the extract, dubbed Es315, into the wafer and then feeding it to patients to see how it moved through the body — the pharmacokinetics.

She said it succeeded on both counts: the wafer-extract combo worked and it then got CBD into people’s bloodstreams.

Bod also says it’s the first “blinded” pharmacokinetic study looking at the impact of a drug made from the full plant.

A blind study is where the patient and the doctor doesn’t know whether they’re taking the drug or a placebo.

While Stockhead found six other pharmacokinetic studies of cannabis featuring double-blind or higher levels of masking on the US site ClinicalTrials.gov, Ms Patterson says none has so far looked at full plant extracts.

She says a growing body of research is suggesting that the single CBD molecule is more effective when it’s taken with the other 250-odd molecules that are present in a marijuana plant.

CBD and THC, the element in cannabis that offers the psychoactive high, are just two of many molecules in a marijuana plant.

Bod’s Swiss partner Linnea SA, which supplies the extracts they use, have found a way to grow low-THC cannabis plants and an extraction process that allows them to produce a standardised CBD extract, without the THC.

Bod is testing its wafer against oils available in the Australian market.

Ms Patterson says they are looking at a low-THC extract for pain management.

Bod stock was up 8 per cent at midday to 58c.

Bod Australia share price over the last 12 months.